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Full text of "U. S. G. Co's. Mexican graphite paint : its uses and users / the United States Graphite Company."

V 



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lis uhcs diid iJb(Tff 



Tl 

<. ' HITI 

• ACiNAW. Ml 



> STATES 

MPANY 



USlG.Co's. Mpxican 

GRAPHm PAINT 

Its uses and usqy^ 



.3- ^fi 


^ 




^^^' 



THE UNITED STATES 
GRAPHITE COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES AKD FACTORY 

SAGINAW MICHIGAN, U.S. A 

MINES IN SONORA, MEXICO 




r 

r 



Copyrisrht 10 J 4 by 

THE UMTED STATES GRAPHITE COHPAW 

SaK:inaw, Michigan, l. S. A. 



Vim 




INTRODUCTORY 




EALIZING that in treating of paints 
— especially of what are termed pro- 
tective paints — the tendency with 
many is to theorize rather than to 
deal with actualities concerning the 
particular paint under consideration, 
we offer within the pages of this 
booklet only such facts pertaining to the Graphite Paint 
which we make, as have been established beyond a 
doubt by authentic data collected by ourselves during 
the years of our experience, and in presenting these 
facts— and they are facts— it will be observed that we 
talk right from the shoulder in good, plain English 
avoiding as far as possible the technical verbiage which 
has more significance in the Laboratory than in the 
Office and which is ofttimes employed by Manufac- 
turers of questionable integrity to masquerade a nos- 
trum as the real thing. 

The different structures herein reproduced will not 
only convey some idea of the varied and extensive use 
of L\ S. G. Go's McxicuN Graphite Paint but will also 
serve as prima facia evidence of the fact that this paint 
is favorably regarded by Architects and Engineers of 
national repute. 

We hope that our effort in this direction may be 
of some service to those in search of a paint which 
really protects. 



THE UNITED STATES GRAPHITE COMPANY 

Saginaw, Michigan, U. S. A. 



U . S . G 


Go's. 


MEXICAN GRAPHITE 


PAINT 


Q □ D D 


o 


CONTENTS 




About Graphite 7 \2 
Two FormationB of Graphii. 

Amorphous vs. "Flake" Gra|)inle 

Uniform Purity of Mexican Graphite 

Mexican Graphite Peculiarly Adapted to Paint Makiii^r 

M^ ^iraphite as a Pijcment 

^ to "Flake" (;raphite as a Pigment 

Arahcial "Graphite" 


Our Vehicle 


14 


' ' ' ' Minin)ized 




' 1 1 

SUndard Colors 


14 H» 


The Covering Power 

How to Estimate Qumntity Needed 


16 


The True Measure of Paint Economy 


18 


Condensed Information 


31 


i>etter» from Satittfi< ,•{ |J. g. G. 

A. ^., ^_. 


Go's 

22 IH 


Approved by t War department 

urn 





tor iUtoitk and Stand-Pipeh 

and \eiibei i'ajnUng 

r Painting 

Con.p^f^t.Nc \ f Sr%eral Widely AJverti^ 

lir^ndH ol (,.„, i» ,,,, .,^ 

Suggc^tumk lor •>'. 

Grmphite P ^__„ 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Two 



<ir«plil«« 




riiad 



rwrHy BBii 



ABOUr GRAIMII IK 

|LTHOUGH graphite— also cal 
black lead — is [■ 
diversity of us* 
prohiif)ly know it fjest in 
ordinary, every-il.iv **!. 
we all know, it i 
is k^hhI or bad 
is uniformly pure or oth« / 

Some of us, too, know it in ' 
favorably or unfavorably as our « 
made from pure or impure Kraphih 

There are two formiiti 
"Hake" and Anmrphnus or 
which must be used for perK ii \ 
hereinafti'r j^iven is conce<led tli 

To be suited to pencil 
uniformht pure — and cat».il 
so as to permit of its ir 

rials which, it will be - 

esftential to good paint making grapl 

Flake V is not a 

it is incapa »» pulvei 

its presence in paint is undesirable. Furthtr ubj« 
stated later. 

Amorphous j^raphite on tb 
reduction to impalpable ;iml i^if 
to combine reatlily an 
pencil makiiu' uifh . 
vehicle. 

Thus tar. tu^wvwi, i! .' 
duce a satisfactorv ptMuil u 
amorphous in i 
more or less iri 
he is. cann 
duced in N 

Regarding, th. 

sei»si t i\ ♦• ft ' i niniif 
u> 



bago and 



ii)riiL»' oi \\ riicn il i ■ 



^uud ;;rapli. 



t*r«9M«« 



W 

mine, iocateti m tr 



onorm, Mcxi 



and 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




MltliiKai) «««rrrl Ilridi:<- 
Holdrn ^itrert \ Indutt 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



l'«T»iHnrly 

\<liiiit(>d to 

Fnint 

MnkinfT 



Mexican 
Grnphltc 



PlKiiiont 



operated by ourselves. This means that all of the larger 
pencil makers both in this country and abroad are and have 
for years been under contract with The United States Graphite 
Company for the most important material entering into the 
manufacture of their product — and why? Simply because 
experience has taught them to look to us for the bent which 
with them stands for purity and absolute uniformity — ^other- 
wise hard, gritty pencils with the attending loss must in- 
evitably result. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE 

As has been intimated, the inherent qualities of graphite 
suitable for pencil or paint making are identical one with the 
other — that is to say the graphite best adapted to either use 
must be (1) pure, (2) susceptible of minute pulverization, (3) 
of a nature to incorporate intimately with other materials and 
(4) absolutely uniform in all these respects. 

Our relation to the pencil industry of the World has 
already been stated and in itself is good evidence that we have 
the right sort of a pigment on which to build a graphite paint 
possessing in the greatest degree all of the many advantages 
afforded by carbon coatings — and that is exactly what we 
offer in 

U. S. G. GO'S MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 

The pigment in this paint is Mexican Graphite mined by 
ourselves, amorphous in formation and analyzing 85 per cent, 
pure natural graphite — this we guarantee. 

It is an absolutely inert substance which, by reason of its 
purity, is impervious to any known exposure — that is to say 
besides exerting no destructive influence on the vehicle or 
corrosive action on metal it is unaffected by smoke, water, 
brine, acids, alkali, extreme temperatures, steam, moisture, 
sulphur fumes or, in fact, by any chemical or climatic con- 
dition thus constituting the ideal protective pigment. 

Amorphous in formation, Mexican Graphite can be and 
is pulverized and air-floated (by a special process of our own) 
to an impalpably fine and gritless powder which is then re- 
ground in oil with which, being finely divided, it unites readily 
and so intimatelv that when finally reduced to ready-for-use 
consistency it does not, like graphite (?) pigments carrying 
a large percentage of silica, etc., precipitate to a hard mass 
at bottom of package. Its light specific gravity also contrib- 
utes to this end. 

The action of crystalline or flake graphite, however, is 
very different for unlike the amorphous product it is, by reason 
of its fibrous-like micaceous nature, both an exceptionally dif- 



ObjectloDN 

to 

**FIake" 

Graphite 

as a 

PIgrmeul 



The 

"Fish Scale" 

Theory 

I^xploded 



U . S . G Co's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



ficult material to grind to even a reasonable degree of fine- 
ness and utterly incapable of the uniform reduction so es- 
sential in a pigment Intended to form the base of a protective 
paint. Then, too, no matter how finely pulverized it remains 
alicayn a flake" similar in form to finely divided mica or fish 
scales a formation which the reader will recognize as less 
T^,t,u u" ,^'^-floated amorphous graphite of combining 
with the vehicle in such a way as to result in the solid, opaque 
fvn!!, fJ "f e«sary for the exclusion of moisture and gases 
trom the surface which it covers and is supposed to protect. 

Furthermore a microscopic examination of a paint film 
carrying crystalline graphite will reveal the fact that instead 
ot overlapping each other and disposing of themselves in a 

k Tf r K^^'' *"* ''''"^'^' °" ^ '•^''f «»• scales on a fish, as 
iL 1 / ^ T^^'" P'"ominent maker of graphite paint, 

thevS .l^^t ^'^ ^^^^^ ""'" scale-like flakes protrude after 
orlti ^^''T^ °^'^'"^'^ *hus creating a rough and more 

tLllZ P„^J«"!,,<^.««t'"g ^vhich catches and absorbs moisture 
penetrat/tn"l'**J"*^ it, together with destructive gases, to 
Set thk ^n hT'^'^I^ ^^^ '"•■^^^^ ^'hich it is desired to 
K'c^iaSs'Lrbeenpp'.Ted^ ^^''^^^"^ ^^'^^ ^^•^^" ^^'° ^"^ 

the c^vsfillin^p'T/r^''^'''"-^'^' " '^ ^^'d^^nt that graphite of 
poses thin amnr^V,^^^ "'^"^^^ '^ '^'■'^ desirable for paint pur- 
poses than amorphous or non-structural graphite. 

rega?d^ •v3>°"!,..'^''^Pl?'^^-' ^^^'^ ^"-^ (if «"« wishes to 
as eranhi^M*^"^''. anthracite coal or "artificial graphite" 
asg.aphite) two sorts— (1) natural and (2) artificial. 

The one is produced by Nature, the other by Man. 

trrao Jt!> nrnH ^}''^'''^\ '"'^'' ^^^* ^^^^ manufacturers of that 
fer and laH. o^ T'* T"'*'''" *« ^^^ P''^^'^"^''^ of foreign mat- 
of na ural LfnK"/^"''T'^-\*^^ '^^^^i Pencil, continue in the use 
ficial nroifrt ? *" ""^^'thftanding that the price of the arti- 

purchase thi. 'V ^u^}^^"" ''"°^'" ^^^t we ourselves could 
K ifcoJt^ n.fn'"'^'**' '^f^^ *'-°'" anthracite coal for less 
prepare for' "tth"'^ m Mexico, transport to Michigan and 
^S>/Pa" fi^^.^S:"''*^ '' ^'^'^h U. S. G. Co.-s Mexican 



With 

Regard to 

A^rtlflelal 

"Graphite" 



cent 'carbon "f «"f.'yze f^ high as 90 or even 95 per 

reallv ^jraMU cLl •J"*'-^t'?"lble whether all of the .same is 
anthrac ti1;il"vhk-h in Th'*^7 " 'f^^ percentage is merely 
and which therefore whpn J '^''T^*°''-'' '^^^° ^^^^ts as carbon 
ite. cannot easn^'e'd^it'iriiu^^red'th^V^f^r^or^'"" '''''' ''^''- 



10 



''WSM 



^^. 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



» 




L ^ 



11 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



I . 



«ll> 



ririiMlhlr 
IMlit-r 



This peculiarity was recently brought to our attention 
in the following rather amusing manner: 

In responding to a request from a paint manufacturer 
for samples and prices of cheap graphite in the dry form 
among the samples we submitted were two qualities of graph- 
ite foundry facings, one containing about 25 per cent, and 
the other about 40 per cent, graphitic carbon, the former, 
of course, being the less expensive. Upon having these 
samples analyzed our customer, to his surprise, received from 
his chemist a report showing the lower priced product to 
carry nearly 60 per cent, graphitic carbon. 

Here is the explanation : 

The facing containing 25 per cent, graphite was made 
by grinding together one ton graphite ore (analyzing 75 per 
cent, graphitic carbon), one ton crude soapstone and one ton 
anthracite coal screenings. Thus in three tons of product 
there were 75 units of (jrapliitic carbon or an arcraf/c ol 25 per 
cent, for each ton. Counting the coal, however, as !()(» per 
cent, carbon there were 175 units of carbon per three tons 
of product or an average of about 58 per cent, "carbon" (re- 
ported by their chemist as graphitic carbon) instea<l of (hiIv 
25 per cent, as claimed by ourselves. 

With the foregoing facts we will leave the reader to draw 
f I own conclusions as to the relative values for paint pur- 
poses of natural amorphous graphite analyzing 85 per cent, 
graphitic carbon and artificial graphite analvzing 90 i)er cent, 
•/carbon," adding only that while the natural product has been 
in use for a great many years and thus has to its credit the 
infallible test of time, the artificial graphite i)igment is of 
recent creation anrl it< v^iHi.iiiiv- ;. ,,. y^,x h,jt a matter of 
theory. 

The question oi purn ij, nowever, >liould alwavs be para- 
mount for obviously if not pure a graphite pigment must con- 
tain other substances— silica, iron, barytes, anthracite car- 
»>on, etc. — which, not being impregnabU under all conditions 
•<^ IS graphite, are a source of weakness. 

True, some paint makers claim the presence of silica and 
" r. ;,N'rials as desirable but upon investigation it will 

' In- found that the natural impurities carried by 



1 rom w • 
arjru^^ 



r pigment is ground are the very 

icial — certainly a strange, not U) say 

ce and yet easily explainable when one 

U\ rn<i monpv to r-liminate these impuri- 



The pigiTK 



^ ' M*.',^UH (iraphitf Paint in, 

as ^reviouBly strntod* natural grraphite guaranteed 85 per cent 

Having: now quite thoroughly diHCUHMd the different 
Rraphite pigrmen^ ^Hrect attention to the care 



\2 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



C B3 







13 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Ahoui t>ur 

LiuNeed 

Oil 



Vne of 

Dryert* 

MininiiaEed 



Re^-irdi exercised by ourselves in preparing the vehicle used in U, S. G. 
the Vehicle ^^'''"^ Mexicau Graphite Paint and combining it with the pig- 
ment. 

Fortunately our consumption of linseed oil is so consider- 
able that for some years past we have been able to contract 
for the entire output of one of the best equipped plants in 
the Northwest wherein we enjoy the advantage of having this 
most important of paint materials made under our own speci- 
fications and supervision and of the very best selected North- 
western flaxseed, thus being assured of an absolutely uniform 
oil eliminated of all impurities and sufficientlv aged to render 
it first-class in every respect. 

We have also originated a special method of treatment 
which so improves the drying properties of linseed oil as to 
attord satisfaction in this regard without that excessive use 
ot .lapans and dryers which tends to shorten the life of paint 
so materially. 

Then, too, besides enjoying these exceptional facilities 
lor securing just the right sort of raw materials we have the 
turther advantage of a plant especially designed and equipped 
lor the manufacture of graphite paint— for we make graphite 
paint 07ihj. Our pulverizers and separators are of a type 
pecuharly adapted to the proper reduction of graphite ore. 
Uur mills are the kind that grind and incorporate a graphite 
pigment with Its vehicle most intimatelv. Our mixers are 
thorough in their work. Our laboratorv is complete. Men 
ot experienc-e are in charge. Every precaution is taken to 
ensure a high-grade paint. Nothing is left to chance. 

So as specialists in graphite paint our undivided atten- 
o-vil^^f^^" ^^^f-^ ^"^ '^^ P^^P^^ production and the believer in 
graphite painting may consistently look to us for the best. 

THE COLOR 

o-ivp '^?,^/^™^'' prospective purchasers of paint are inclined to 
frfhri '"""?. ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^-'^ as perhaps more pleasing 
Inli^rf/^/ tu ^""^ "^^^^ ^^^'^ demand a few paint grinders have 
Ln4nS r.^ '^'l^^^'^^y of preparing a line of light color 
giaphite ( /) paints. 

Cn\fJ\\ "at"^al^ color of graphite, a dark slate (see our 
DiJmpntV f ^"^ """"K'^'^ changed by the introduction of coloring 
wS nf I ^"^"t^ty sufficient to produce the desired shade 
finished nLTn^^^^^^^^^ '''^"'"' ^^' percentage of graphite in the 
tect^vrvrC ' Proportionately detracting from its pro- 

naintlV wH^h ''*''"'u" ^^^^ ^^^ ^""^^ structures as are usually 
t^on In Vnv ^'^P^'t^ paint color is a secondarv considera- 
in hp Lni; ""''^"^ '''' ''^^^^^ a dark color as preferable, for 
le or S^ i^"*/""''''- ^'*^^''>' atmosphere of a manufactur- 
ing or laihoad d.^tnct light-colored surfaces soon become 



Gruiiiiii 

Pain 

■Speclall 



Ah 



lulruduclluu 
of Culiirlne 



14 



» 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





*^ 



11 II IL. 

mil 



Sti'%t>iiH Point, WiMcoiiMin. Pont Ollive 
llaiisficld. Ohio, Pont Otlh-o 
Alpena. >liflii»?iiii. Post Offlre 

James Corse, Contractor, Racine, Wisconsin 



.^. 



i i 



15 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



\MiUt in 

"Cov«'rinK; 

Power f " 



Thin Coat IS 
Thick CoalK 



soiled and streaky— so we don^t attempt the lighter shades 
Our Five ^ ^^^ ^^'^ ^^^^' durable colors : 

standard Color A (natural color), Color D (dark brown), 

Colore (dark green), Color C (jet black), 

Color E (red) 
Ask for our Color Card. 

COVERING POWER 

fiia oT^^r^-^^^^ "covering power" as here employed refers to 
rne ability of a pamt to form, when spread over a certain 
fn Wff.^JI^^/ ?• ^^ coating of sufficient body and opacity 
to attord effective protection to the surface which it covers/ 

rn^^^^^l^^ T^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^"^ ^^^^t this result with a thm 
applied thickl "^"^^^ economical than one which must be 

Both the first cost and the cost of maintenance are less, 
that w^fli I'ff"' .though prices per gallon be the same a paint 

onf s^iirp .!">. ?i"^>l '^''^^ ^^^ -^"^^^s ^f s^rf^ce f«r e^^ery 
less infir!f ? 'H ^?:^P^titor will cover is of a certainty 
becait f>fil''''^^'''l^^^ ^^^^ ^^ maintenance is minimized 
foTlo^'ncr V *'''^^' ^^ P^^P^^ b^^>^ ^"d opacitv are, for the 
tollowing reasons, more durable than thick coats, 

if H J^^ ^^"^^^ "brushing out" a paint will stand the better will 
Thi2 t^' f ^r^ ^* ''^*^* ^^ ^^ t^ ""ite with subsequent coats, 
tinn nA I, "^ - '"^^^^^ *^^ knitting together in the forma- 
and olJT ^^"^.^^f^e^ous coating have a tendency to separate 
fn^^^nH o^ particularly when applied to constantly contract- 
ing and expanding metal surfaces. 

wp^fW^;^^*-^?^*'^' Me.r/ca// Graphite Paint under normal 
7auarp fppT"^!.^'^"' Yl^^ effectively coat approximately 1,000 
Xd ormif''i '"'''''*^ ^^^^^ P^^ ^^11«" ^nd other surfaces, 
Tkill of f^. '• T P^^Portion according to condition and the 
Powerof r!/i^'"^''- , ^^^'^ ^-^ ^'^^"t three times the covering 
words ?o hp J'^'if "^^ ^''''' t^^t of -mineraP' paints; in other 
cliaseVl^VA^^^^^ ^'''\ ^" ^^'^t cost lead paints must be pur- 
of our nroZ; 't^^ ""I^- ^^""^^^^ P^^^ts at one-half the price 
due aHowanlS. In estimating one's requirements, however, 
of architertn^ "^T^"^ H ?^'^^ ^^^ ^^'^'^te of paint, complexity 
etc Si,h "n ;v.'^ '1 ^^^^^^ employed, weathei^ conditions, 
the;>™?/V>^^^^ ^"'^•' ''^ ^ P^i^ter of average skill makes 
ffe i-an?f approximately as follows: 



Ho^v 

Thin CoatH 

Reduce 

Flrnt CoMt 

and 

MlnimlEe 

Cost of 

Malntenaiio<> 



Covern 

1.CHN» 

!<quare Feei 

Per Gallon 



Hovr i< 
BMtlmat« 
Quantln 



RS'scah'"'" ^" 'i'^ P^'"ted wood ""^'o'sq' "ft. 



Second Coat 

550 sq. ft. 

900 sq. ft. 

900 sq. ft. 

according 



16 



■ 1^ fcrr tm^ 



>M-i^ia«:»^^— — ^»^ 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




^ 



i 




Briar Cliflf Manor Addition, Xew York, N. Y. 

Terry & Tench Co., Contractors 
Kvanston Public Library, Evanstoiir IlllnoiB 




17 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



The True 

Meannre of 

Paint 

Bconomy 



ll"»i IIm- 

li«*m or 

I'abor 

AITeria Ihr 

Com or 

Maintenance 



■"» Prom a 

R"iM>nr>lbl, 

Maker 



Thus It IS seen that U. S. G. Co.'s Mcrican Graphite 
Pamt possesses, by virtue of its purity, both the covering 
power essential to reasonable first cost and the durabilitv 
imperative to low cost of maintenance. 

PAINT ECONOMY 

It has been well :;aid that— 

ro.f Jf^ ^^'"i"'"'^' ^'alue of a paint is the sum total of the 
orti^Jf '"'""' ^""^ ^*' application divided by the number 
of times of renewal within a given term of years." 

is vll^^^J speaking but one-third of the co.st of painting 
hirdflT r ^^^ P"^-chase of paint materials about two- 
Da int inl^ ' '''''°' °^ application, .so the true measure of 
thXlT I 'V'"* '"■''" ^'"' »«'''"' ''"' y^'^*--^ of service for 
same aPPl.v'ng good paint and poor paint are the 

exneifdenTn"^' •*";""■ *^^^ "^ ^ '^''^^'"' --^um—say $150.00- 
eoes W fl P«'"V"« ^ 8:i^'e" «"rface but one-third ($50.00) 
?er Jllnn n ■'''""*.'^'''^' '^ '^ ^'^^'^ ^^at even bv cutting the 
$25"00 whfl"' V^"" *^" ^''^ '^'^•"t «f the job is reduced only 
$25.00, u h.ch IS about 16 per cent, of the total outlay. 

Now consider 

Is (hi.s 16 per cent, really saved? 

You can't' hnv"''*'''-!', 'f'"* """ '^■^P^'^ts to sacrifice quality, 
paint at LeLlf ;'!,'' '^'^'' "* ^■^''^•° P'-'*^^-^- ^^'^^n you buy 
for good naint V ''"'' ^•^'^"' '^>- '"eputable manufacturers 

which wonlH • """^ ^P* *« S^^^t *^^'en less than half value 
within a nJnn^T ""'i^P'^ ^"""^ '•^"^^^•^'••^ «« against two 
ci ed thts wnMH ''•'■ ^^^^^" >'««'-'^- I" the in.stance above 
$300 00 or »„ "-epre-sent the outlay of $.500.00 as against 
as agaL^tMooo""^^'- ■'^'^'' ^"^t "<" maintenance of $3.3..3.S 
'o rLcc7,^?-^w^" ?"■""'" °^ ^'^ P*^*- ^•*^"t- i" «ther words 

ing two extra ren'ewals!'" ''""' ''■'' '■'^'"" "^ *^*^ ^''P'"'*' ^"'^"''' 

for r^en^^l\"oa,V'^T.''^ ^" '^' P^'"""^ "' ^"'•f»'«''^ acce.ssible 
such as the .t^Pl b < * protection of inaccessible surfaces 
are sure tL^fn'^'^^T-' "^ "">• """dern skyscrapers is. we 
for here the n4 invnl J ^,1^*^' "t *^''*'" ^'"^'*ter importance 
issoenormousast \. Z^'"''"^'' weakening by corrosion 

paint of drmons^rJti r*'"''^"* ^'■*^'">' P"^'**'^'^ precaution. Only 

and unqutSed'i^^ttg'ra'V'Il.l'rdY ^ --."f-'!,-- "^ ><"-■" 
iHitf^riiv sMouJd be considered. 



ft 



18 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





(Mittrr it'll Hr»-»^iiiu; « .mhihiii>. t lii«-: 



r. >l:iri€-. ^lifhiKiin 
i>. llliiioi<« 



19 



U . S . G Co's, 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Condenaed 
lufurinatlon 



Flral Coat 

ttDd 

Coat or 

MalBlrMBBrf 



D«rablllt> 



l*ro|M-rtlr 



IN A NUTSHELL 

you will secure in U. S. G. Co.'s Mexican Graphite Paint 
a protective coating of 

(1) reasonable first cost 

(2) low cost of maintenance 

(3) maximum durability 

(4) proper covering power 

(5) satisfactory drying properties 

(6) excellent working qualities 

Reasonable first cost because of reasonable price and large 
covering power. 

Low cost of maiiitenaitcc because of durability. 

Maximum durability because our Mexican Graphite by 
reason of its uniform purity is an absolutely inert pigment 
and as such not only has no deleterious effect on oil and no 
corrosive action on metal, but is absolutely unaffected by 
smoke, water, brine, acids, alkali, extreme temperatures, 
steam, moisture, sulphur fumes or, in fact bv anv chemical or 
climatic condition. Then, too, as has already been pointed 
out, it is susceptible of minute pulverization and of such a 
nature as to combine readily and intimately with the vehicle 
which consists of pure linseed oil made under our own specifi- 
cations and supervision and specially treated in a manner to 
ensure satisfactory drying with minimum use of dryers. Its 
elasticity permits its use on metal surfaces without cracking, 
scaling or peeling with the contraction and expinsion of the 
surface which it covers. It is adhesive. 

Proper covering power becau.se it mav be spread over a 
greater than ordinary area and .still form an opaque and 
waterproof coating of good bodv— a coating which will unite 
homogeneously with sub.sequent applications. 

> ' faciarif drying properties because it will dry within 

a i> ii< ' ;il,l(^ ]( nvrth ,,{ tim*. xvi<h'.')« iht^ excessive use of strong 
dryer- 

tj ran tit atjrkimj qualiii(s l>ecause it will spread easily 
on iron, steel or galvanized iron surfaces without running even 
in cold weather and does not settle hard in bottom of package. 

tion of these claims we have on file a great 
1 have been written to us from time to time 
of the paint which we make. 



man> 



A few (»f iVu^vi. h.it,.^. 



are printed on the following pages. 



20 



T!9" 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



» 



3 9 

t 



ll 



' 5 

e s 




21 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 
Address Bureau of Equipment, Navy Department, 
and Refer to No. 190,451 

Washington, D. C. Feb. 2. ll»(n>. 
The United States Graphite Co., 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Gentlemen : 

1. The Bureau informs you that, after a careful comparison uf 
graphite paints at the Navy Yard, New York, it has found vour product 
to be equal in efficiency and durability to others of its class. 

2. This comparison will be considered in the award <.f futurv 
contracts. 

V^ery respectfully, 
(Signed) Wm. S. Coulis, 

Chief of Bun-;!" "f !"-■, ...Mx-nf 

WAR DEPARTMENT 
Office of Chief of Ordnance 

,,., ,, ., , Washington, Mav U, VJM. 

'^- ' nited ....,,.. i.iaphite Co.. 
Saginaw, Michigan. 

' ineu : 

I .^'^^{i^'';:'"?)^)'^'' letter of June 12, 190C (17883-127), I am instruct 
S^^. .u ^^^ "t ^'•^"a"<^e to enclose herewith report of the test of the 
pamts ther. ■ ..J to. A circular letter has been sent to the Or- 

naint ^ *^f ^authorizing them to consider your special green 

paini and , ab pamt in competition with others for use on 

^r.'«MtK *?"" ';^'*''»*»^«- It is of C3ur.se understood that the pa nt llu-y 
are authorized to consider shall be the .same as that tested 
Very Respectfully. 
(Signed) Lamson M. Fuller 
Major. Ord. Dept 

CITY OF CLEVELAND 
Department of Charities and Corrections 

Cleveland. Ohio. .\ov. 14. 1892. 
• •'.• V riiuMi suU's Graphite Co., 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
f'entlemen: 

f e «l!f*.!!f P*^'^.*^^.,^;^ "*JviRe you that your paint which we applied to 
eth^l?» ^"n '^"''^^'^^^ ^^^^^ ^iven entire satisfaction thus far and 
r w-Jmomy '*"** ^^^ '*'*" """P^y i"«tify your .lam. 



Appruvrd 

b> Ihe 

I. ^. War 

Dvparimrat 



(Signe 



PENNSYLVANIA ICE COMPANY. Ltd 

' ^ Graphi'. 
-^, Micbigai.. 

Marrh -we p-jr. has4'd fi-.m v..u :* ,. .„.,.!. 



%«»••!. - ^« *»*ve u- 
far as w^ arf> 



(luantity 
in and 
jtmofsl 



ding it to thot^ whf. desire a paint 



K. H. S«ely. Mrr. 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



^ 



5 * 



>- 2 




23 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



ICfrfcIeut 
Under 



h'ur 
HHdicr 



SWIFT & COMPANY 
Union Stock Yards 

The United States Graphite Co., Chicago, Dee. 26th, 1S1»2. 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Gentleynen: 

We have tried many kinds of protective paints for exposed iron 
work and find your Graphite Paint gives us the best satisfaction. 

Yours respectfully, 
(Signed) H. A. Bower, 

Master Mechanic. 



UNION STOCK YARD & TRANSIT CO. 
OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



("hicago. Dei-. 2<l. 1;h)2. 



The United States Graphite Co.. 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Gentleinen : 

As requested by you, we have tested your graphite paint by apply- 
ing it to the screens in the sheep house where it comes in contact with 
the fumes of ammonia, and are pleased to say that it has stood the 
test better than anything we have ever used heretofore. The bhl. order 
given you recently will assure you that the same was satisfact<jry. 
Yours very truly, 

(Signed) W. G. Morgan. 

Acting Purchasing .Agent. 

CHICAGO BRIDGE AND IRON CO. 

The United States Graphite Co., Chicago, August 2sth, VMrl. 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
^tcntlemen : 

•♦u^\^* ^-^^ pleasure in stating to you that after five vears experience 
with Mexican Graphite Paint as manufactured by Vou we find it 
thoroughly satisfactory and expect to continue its use ■ind'efinitely. 

Yours trulv, 
(Signed) Chicago Bridg'e & Iron Co., 

By Henry W. Wilder, Sec'y. 



VM\2, 



tatc that 
, and arc 
red. We 

.r in th< 



WISCONSIN BRIDGE AND IRON CO. 

Tu TT -^ J o^ ^ .North .Milwaukee. Wis., Nov. 

The United SUtes Graphite Co . 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Genthmen : 

WP J^v/^^^^^^u^^''^''^ ^^^' ^'^^ '"^t- ^^^* '*»*• pleased to s 
r«H«fiIf T^ l^^ Mexican Graphite Paint for over five vears 
«r; l^«i t 'I *^ ^^ ^""^^ ^'" ^">' ^rar>hite paint manufactu 
s^cificlTtlol"''"'"' "^ ^^'^^ P^'"^ '^ n.e..r..ally called U 
Yours respectfully, 
(Signed) Wisconsin BnOge <k iron Co., 

. . By H. A. Wagner, 

Sec'y. and Treas. 

KENWOOD BRIDGE CO. 

The ^"'^^ SUtes GraphiU^ Co., Chicago, Nov. V3, 11»02. 

baginaw, Michigan. 
^jenUenien : 

Mexi^n^r«!?K;^*'J" response to your inquiry that we have used your 

erv^n^rLI^^H f *l"^ ^^^ ?'^^''*' y^""^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ that it has given 

..roniaf ^tisfaction and Uke pleasure in giving vou this testi- 



/e Yours very truly, 

(signed) Kenwood Bridge ( - 



i'resiaeni. 



24 



^ 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





Teiitk Avfiiui- llridKr. >l imirai.olis, Miiiiu-sota 
Coal Doiks I>iilnlli. MissalM- A Xortlurii It. 11. Co. 



25 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



KleinentM 

for 

Ten ^ enrN 



Mexican 

Graphite 

Pain« 

Bent 



IniperviouH 

•o Salt AJr 

Gxpoaurr 



Mich., Jan. Id. 1HU8. 



Acceptable 
to the 



MICHIGAN MILLING CO. 

The United States Graphite Co., Ann Arbor, 

Sag-inaw, Michigan. 
Dear Sirs: 

crnnH^f ^u^"" w'' ^ nuniber of years used your Graphite Paint with 
w?h..f ;i We have this year painted five elevators on four of which 
h^ff /J ^^^ ^r^ Graphite Paint. We would have done .so in the lifth case 
IrJh J P^^"'/^^' condition existing. We send with this letter a photo- 
Th^-. w/c 1 \^''"^? elevator, one of those which we have just painted. 
the Ji7f W r'"^'"^ ''^'^^ Graphite paint, ten years ago, aud n'hilv 
iui ZoLt^ /''' 'T'" .somcc/iaf hij the elements the bnifding n.,s 
n av bp of nf/TV ^^' "'^"/,^'-- We make these statements as they 
may De of mterest to you. We are, 

Yours truly, 
(Si^ed) Michigan Milling Co., 

Per G. F. Allmendinger, Secretary. 



Dec. 17. i:n: 



Vdur 
atcr 



SAVANNAH BREWING COMPANY 

The United States Graphite Co.. Savannah, Ga., 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
(jentlemen: 

M^xiean^ rrnhil" ^°"'\ '"H"">- beg ,„ say. that we have use.l 
P^pes ^nd o? 1 ".f"'" .T '^''^'•y ^-^y' "" ' ""«■ tanks, oils, waler 
ft to be absnb.tlu -''""."^ ^^^^ T'^ '""''^ think of, and we have foun.l 
many vears of Iv "• '° ^^^^'thing: that you ,M-o„,i.sed. After a great 
say that MevLn'^r"'"ul '^'•**> ^^^ ^'""^^ <"f P^'iits, we are eandid t<, 
we^have used^t onH^'^P^''^,'! *^^ "^'^ ^est for purposes for which 
a parnrth-afw'ii ^.h^ ^Ul'^le^.^L.tr."""^"' '" '" ^"•^""^ "'''''"' 

Yours very truly. 
Savannah Brewing Company, 

W. W. Starr. Manager. 



BRADLEY-RAMSEY LUMBER CO. 



Lake ( h;. .1,. 



within thiity day.s 
roofs. Consign 



^.'v.- Limed .Mates Graphite Co., 

J^agmaw, Michigan. 
Gentlemen: 

vo.,/r" "l^*y 'il'P "« ^"y time 

trouble here has been' '" ^' '^'- ""''' "material wc 
peculiarities af fh^ r ^^ ^^^ "* ^^'"^ ^^^^ would he impervious t 

^aint do^nh^bti„e':rrou^--;t:[.>;Ltf::iiot ^' •- -'^- 

Very respectfully yours, 
(bigned) Bradley-Ramsey Lumber Co.. 

By Wm. E. Ramsey, President. 



\X[*2. 



thrcf banc 
a me a.s [irc 
ever userl 



1^ of 
vioii . 
Our 
[> the 
^'our 



JAMES CORSE, 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Racine, Wis., Jan. 



ine United Sutes Graphite Co 

alinol? alPthl ^s^^'^offir?^*''^^ ^^^'^^^ ^^^ ^^^'^^ furnished 

that in every i^Uncf ?h "^'^'^^ T ^^^'^ constructed, desire 
verv accepUble t^ fh" r ^^ material supplied by y^ur firm ha 
caus. of?^,p,ai^, the Government Officials and that w. h;n <■ 
>>plaint or trouble regarding the same. 
Respectfully, 

James Corse. 
By Wm. F. Kachel, C. E. 



110 4. 



us for 

to say 

been 

(1 no 



26 



J5U ' 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



td Pi 
(JtJ OB 



wr- 



2 » 




27 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Cheaper than 

35e. Paint 

for 

Elevator 

Painting 



SANDUSKY GRAIN CO. 

Sandusky. Mich., June 27, 19(m. 
The United States Graphite Co.. 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Gentlejnen : 

In reply to yours of the 25th. Would say that so far we are 
very well pleased with results of your green Graphite Paint and. will 
very likely need another half-barrel within a short time. 

We are receiving many compliments on the looks of our plant 
smce pamting with this color as it is a contrast to the other plants 
thru this section. Its covering ability is quite remarkable and we 
think at this price it is much cheaper to cover the surface than with 
.'ir)c Coal Tar compounds. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Sandusky" Grain Co.. 

A. L. Chamberlain, Mgr. 



Given Entire 

SatlHfaetion 

on Important 

RuildlnKH 



For 
Ciaa Holders 



THE INGALLS IRON WORKS CO. 

rp, TT v ^ o. . r^ , . Birmingham, Ala.. Dec. 20, 191:?. 

The United States Graphite Co., 

Saginaw, Michigan. 
Gentlemen : 

Replying to your favor of the 16th, wish to sav that we have used 
your Graphite Paint on some of the most important buildings and 
structures in this district and it has always given us entire satisfaction. 
It gives us pleasure to endorse it. 

Yours respectfully, 
The Ingalls Iron Works' Company. 

By Wm. F. Thornton. Sec. and Treas. 



S|>riiiKfi«lil <.aN l.i»clit t «„ 

Srin^fieid. III. 

i'«M»ri;i C.UK AL Kiet'trif Co.. 
IN-oria. 111. 

l>v:iiiHvilh- i;;iM & Kleetrie t/tKht Cn 
Kvansville. In.i. 

U illi:iiiiM|M»rt (;aM <o., 

Williamsport. J'a. 
o^.-iuiii.-it^ City (;nM <"o., 

'"^a^inaw, Mich. 
Ha.\ ( ity liiiK Co., 

, . J'ay City. Mich. 

l\:il:iiiiayoo t.-.tn Co., 

,, ,. . Kalamazoo. Mich. 

l*«Hiti;M- I, IK lit to.. 

, , I'ontiac. Mich. 

.I.'m-Kmoii (,:im Co.. 

Jacks'- 



(Htiif of 

W. H. BARTHOLD, 

Consulting Engineer 



New York. N. Y. 

October 2. 1907. 



CIRCUL.AR LETTKli No. 17 TO MAXAGKRS OF HRANCHKS 

,. e HOLDER PAINT 

iJear Sir : 

for h'^M^r^Tc^"*^ ^t^P experience we have found that the best paint 
ent ^ranhft ^'^f^'^ P?'"^' ^^^ ^'^^ have found, too. that of the d Wer- 

lhan''^'";J nllni^ ^f"'^ ^^ ^''^^ thought to be a little more expensive 
reaLaWe d^fflr.n '^' ^^■^^' ^r^»*i"P POwer more than offsets any 
t^ Til^^\fT *" P^'T '"^u/^'* ^^^ ^'•^^ ^-^^t '« concerned, and then. 
P^int w'can buy """"" ^"''"^^^ '^"^ "^ ''^'^'^ ^' ^^ '^^ ^^^^-P-^^ 
U S G^Co^'Y^S^^'' you would paint your holders with nothing but 
I'J: fran^n^ ^.l '^" Graphite Paint in its natural color. On the 
framing, however, may be used their Color "D" (Dark Browne 



28 



U . S . G Cos 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





mma, 



TJ 



U . S . G - Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Mode Both 
I'!iI<I and 



(•iiiiuiraf i« r 



as this combination of colors gives the holders a very attractive ap- 
pearance. This paint should be bought direct from The United States 
Graphite Co., Saginaw, Mich. 

Before again painting any holders, if you cannot see your way 
clear to do as above requested, please take the matter up with nic. 

Yours truly, 



Copy to — 
W. R. 
E. W. 
H. D. 
S. B. S. 
S. B. 

Prior to 



(Signed) W. H. Barthold. 



R. 

E. 



Springfield 
Peoria 
Evansville 
Saginaw 
Bay City 



W. B. 
A. B. 
J. W. 

M. E. 



Kalamazoo 
Kalamazoo 
Pontiac 
Jackson 



issuing the above instruction to his Branch 
Managers Mr. Barthold, besides conducting a number of very 
thorough and comprehensive field tests stretching over a 
period of several years, took the additional precaution to sub- 
mit samples of three of the most widely advertised makes of 
Graphite Paint (inclusive of our own and all of which had 
previously been tested in the field) to one of the most promin- 
.^nt rbpniists in the United States with the foF ' 



lowiiTg resul 



J. H. MATTHES 



Laboratory for Practical Research and Industrial Development 
36 LaSalle St. 

., „, , Chicago, III., St'pt. \:i, 1I*;»7 

Mr. W. H. Barthold, Consulting Engineer, 
C/o Hodenpyl, Walbridge & Company. 
7 Wall Street. 

New York City. 
Dear Sir: 

We submit the following report on the inv. t rat i..n <.f thr... 
samples of graphite paint recently submitted: 

We have designated the samples as follows: 
No. 1. U. S. G. Co/k Mexican Graphite Paint, 

The United States Graphite Co., 
Saginaw, Mich. 
(Name of Maker will be given on request.) 
(Name of Maker will be given on request.) 
The paints will hereafter be designated by their numbers. 

> Paint No ^ 



No. 2. 
No. 3. 



Linseed Oil 

Moisture 
Graphitic Ca. bon 

Combined Moistun 

Insoluble Silica 
Soluble Silica 
Iron Oxide 
Titanium Oxide 
Alumina 



per cent 



(Fc'_'0' 

CJ 
(A 



Lead Soap from drier 

Manp-anese Soap from drier 

'" of Lead 

yi Manjranej^e 

Rumh 



1 


V 


3 


69.35 


57.89 


55.16 


.20 


.40 


.40 


24.43 


13.44 


13.68 


T!* 


1.00 


.r,i 


66 


7.07 


13.56 


1.74 


5.49 


5.48 


:.v.i 


1.37 


3.40 


.13 


.35 


.60 


1 70 


4.12 


5.74 


IH 


.35 


.20 


J I 


.85 


.22 


trace 


.11 


.16 


.63 




.20 


or. 




.39 



<^ 






U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





!f~H^JwH 



New Vork. Neiv Haven A Hartford R. R. Co. 



31 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



l-''liieneMM 
I'licmf III 



SiliAU 

aH a 
l*lieiiif lit 



%aal>.i. 
\ rblHr 



Graphitic Carbon } 

Combined Moisture \ per cent. 

Insoluble Silica 

Soluble Silica 



Iron Oxide 
Titanium Oxide 
Alumina 
Calcium Oxide 
Magnesium Oxide 
Manganese Oxide 



1 
84.05 

2.20 

5.83 

1.10 

.44 

5.69 

.93 

.71 

trace 



Paint No. 



2 
42.60 

20.02 

15.54 

3.88 

1.00 

11.68 

1.00 

2.45 

.30 



3 
32.27 

30. 9G 
12.51 
7.87 
1.51 
13.54 
.60 
.49 
.37 



{Fe203) '* 

(Ti02)_ " 

(AI203) •* 

(CaO) - 

(MgO) - 

(MnO) " 

From the analysis it can readily be seen that Paint No. 2 contains 
a large amount of clayey matter and also much added silica. The V. 
S. G. Co'h Mexican Graphite Paint (No. I) contains no minerals in- 
tentionally added. The residue is an impure clay. Paint No. 3 con- 
tarns added sihca as well as large amounts of clavev matter. It also 
contams much iron. * ' 

Our tests show that the graphite in Paint No. 2 is the coarsest. 
Other thmgs bemg equal the more finely ground the pigment, the more 
uniform will be the coating. We fail to see the superiority of flake 
graphite as a pigment. It is highly improbable that the flakes will 
arrange themselves in an even, symmetrical laver; on the contrary 
it is very likely that they will overlap and thus increase the tendencV 
to scale While the fineness of the pigment is an important factor in 
tne quality of the paint, one must not disregard the composition of 
the pigment when considering the durability of the paint. 

Pure carbon, even lamp-black, ground in good linseed oil. will make 
an extremely durable coating, the reason for this being that an inert 
material like carbon surrounding itself with and absorbing large quanti- 
ties of linseed oil, is better able to .stand corrosion than more chemically 
Jrnl^'^"'^ ri?^'' o^^^^L^ as clays. Analysis shows that in the pigment 
«m^.n^^7 1 ''* ^/onn^a^' ^^"^ ^^'^^^'^ graphite and about an equal 
thl TJ!. ^•n\^"n^^^'^2"^!'^ insoluble silica. Paint No. 3 containi in 
•^OQfi^/— 1 tV^^T- ^^'•^P^^^' ^bout the .same amount of clay and 
(Nn UT^ ^ '"'i'*^- ^" ^^^ ^'' •^- ^^' <^«'« '^/-^^>«" Graphite' Pai.t 
inH 9 90. -^'Tm^ con.sists of 81.42'.^ of graphite, about HJ'i clay 
fattr n?c^ insoluble silica. From this it must be evident that the 
latter pigment is superior to the other two. It requires from r, to H 

for a"lik'/nlnr."^%^'?'' C"""^'^ ^^ »^-f^^'^^' into^ pa. s[" whereas. 
a nain Lntf" -^^ ""^ 'u'^^ ^^^^ 5/7 gallons are required. Therefore. 

nelrlv n.irr^r^^K^."'""^.*"?''"^'" ^»*'^^ ^'^^ ^'^ "^^^*^ cheaper than a 
nearly pure graphite paint, but its value is proportionately lessened. 

Paint No. ^ 



1 



98.10 

.92 

.09 



2 
89.17 

.HT, 



3 
98.40 

.92 
.36 
.68 



Lin»eed Oil 

Unsaponifiable matter ^^'^ 

Lead Soap 

Manganese Soap 

Lead Resinate HI ...... 

Manganese Resinate //." iH 

Rosin 'III... " '. Iff 

been^t*!-L'ii!«'''!ri" »>» <^,'!e« *» V Hnseed oil. In pVint No. ^Ihe oirJiM 
oTmKin «^ meUllic resinate. thus accounting for the presence 

but mLkPK ftT'"'*^'^" the analysis. This gives the oil a daVk color 

n fact thai pure Imseed oils do c< . of 

matt^^r. We refer to the work of N r,em- 



C« 



^MHMrtMMBiMa 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




Alton Ligrht & Traction Co.. Mitchell. lilinolM 
Alton. Granite City & St. Loula Traction Co.. Mitchell, llllnolit 

Kenwood Bridge Co., Chicago, Illinois, Contractors 



33 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



CompurlMon 
of Hent 

HcNiMtlllUM' 



ill \ame 

nnlv 



«»r ItuMin 
L>pf rliiirnfnl 



Per cent, loss on 1 grrain 

sample Paint No. 

12 3 

During 1st ten-minute period of ignition 20.94 2(]A')H :57.4r) 

2nd '* 19.03 ir).95 24.03 

3rd " 22.90 19.0.^) 1*).9(> 

4th " 19.36 19.02 .07 

5th " 15.19 10.39 

6th " 1.50 1.50 

^th " • .04 .20 

Our object was to ascertain the relative hardness of the graphites 
by noting their resistance to heat. The method is as follows: A gram 
of the purified carbon was weighed into a platinum crucible and the 
latter heated in a vertical position over a ('haddock burner for exactly 
ten minutes. After cooling the crucible was weighed and its con- 
tents thoroughly stirred with a platinum wire and again ignited for 
ten minutes. This process was continued until the loss in weight was 
insignificant. In all cases the same burner and the same flame were 
used so that our results are comparable with each other. We have 
expressed our results as the percentage loss of the pure carbon after 
Ignition for successive ten minute periods. 

Our data show that in seventy minutes, practicallv all of the 
purified graphite from Paint No. 2 can be burned off;' the same is 
true for the I. S. G. Co.'s Mej-iraii Graphite Paint (No. 1). In thirty 
nimutes the graphite from Paint No. 3 is burned awav almost entirely, 
showing It to be soft and easily consumed. Our work on the composi- 
tion of these pigments in the combustion furnace has verified the above 
deductions. Very truly vours, 

(Signed) J.H. Matthes. 

It will be seen from the foregoing analysis that in Paint 
No. 2 less than one-half and in Paint No. 3 less than one- 
third of the pigment is graphite and that our pigment con- 
tains twice as much graphite as the former and nearly three 
times as much as the latter. 

It will also be obseryed that as these other brands (names 
on request) contain less graphite than silica and other sub- 
stances they are really ''graphite" paints in name only— .so 
called in order to help sell them—slVicii and similar materials 
being purposely added in order to reduce cost of production. 

As graphite paint, then, ours has twice the value of the 
one and three times the yalue of the other. 

Another consideration which we wish to point out is the 
^^reater fineness to which our pigment is ground thereby per- 
mitting more intimate incorporation with the vehicle and still 
another is the superior quality of our vehicle which carries no 
rosin or other hfe-shortening adulterants. 

There is, however, always this to rememljer 

The best paint may through careless and improper appli- 
cation be rendered less efficient even than poor paint which 
has been carefully applied to a properly prepared surface— 

\^\.u 5^\^'^^"^^ ^"^ ^ protective coating may easily be almost 
wholly destroyed. 

The application of paint, therefore, should be made after 
well-thought-out specifications and under intelligent super- 
vision. We offer a few Hi^gH<ti(»n< in this regard on the 
lollowing page. 



34 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



^s 






2. « 



I* 





35 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



Form 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THE PROPER APPLICATION 
OF GRAPHITE PAINT 

"^Form ^^ ^^^"^^ P^^"^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ spread freely, thin with 

**"" boiled linseed oil to proper consistency. 

Is ordinarily mixed in proportions of one gallon semi- 
I I'nM. ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^"^ ^"^ one-half gallons boiled linseed oil, thus 
making two and one-half gallons ready-for-use paint. If too 
thick to spread freely add more oil. 

Boiled linseed oil is also recommended for reducing our 
paste paint but where conditions require quicker drying than 
can be secured with the use of boiled oil, good Japan Dryer 
may be added— we recommending not to exceed 8 to 10 per 
cent, by weight. 

Owing to some of the shades varying in bulk we recom- 
mend reducing the paste in accordance with table shown 

below : 

Quantity of Quantit!/ of 
paste per ready-for-usc 

(gallon of paiut produc- 
rehide ed with this 

mixture 

POUNDS GALLONS 
(Natural) 6.5 1.5 

(Dark Green) 6.9 1.5 

(Jet Black) 4,0 1.38 

(Dark Brown) 6.25 1.5 

(^^(^) 6.9 1.5 

In painting new wood surfaces, cover knots and sappy 
spots with shellac and prime with U. S. G. Co.'s Mexican 
Graphite Paint reduced with boiled linseed oil to a insis- 
tency considerably thi,uur than regular readv-for-use paint, 
bemng in mind that old, dry wood requires more oil (thinner 
pamt) than new wood. Necer prime trith ochre. It dries 
too hard and subsequent coats do not unite with it. For first 
coats on metal surfaces use our regular liquid consistency. 

Under average weather conditions and if genuine boiled 
oil IS used no dryer is necessary. Dryer is never a valuable 
addition to any paint and should onlv be used to facilitate 



PrJiuliiu 



Color "A" 
Color "B" 
Color "C" 
Color *'D" 
Color "E" 



36 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



matters where unusual conditions demand quicker drying than 
pure boiled linseed oil will of itself afford. 

Keep paint well stirred when in use mid apply in THIN 
coats well and evenly brushed. This is imperative. Thin 
Application coats assist drying, are more elastic and give longer and more 
efficient service than thick coats. When applying two coats 
let sufficient time intervene to allow first coat to dry thorough- 
ly before second application. 

Be sure and clean as thoroughly as possible the surface 
to be painted, removing rust, grease, loose paint, etc., with 
wire brush or scraper. Any paint to adhere well, must have 
a firm surface to cling to, and the covering capacity of any 
paint is absolutely dependent upon surface and weather con- 
ditions and ability of painter. 

If applied in accordance with above instructions U. S. G. 
Co.'s Mexican Graphite Paint will not peel, blister, crack or 
scale, but will constitute a firm, elastic, adhesive and durable 
covering and will be found strictly as guaranteeed. 



37 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 







11 



I 



88 



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U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




Seventh Street Viaduct, De« Moines. Iowa 

Pittsburg-Des Moinrs Steel Co.. ContraLtors 
Viaduct, Lnion Station A«*o.iatioii. Ilctroit, Mlciiisran 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




i 



R4N;kefeller BalldlaK 
CleTelaad, Ohio 



40 



M^HMMriM 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




Bockefeller Bnlldlnff 
CleTelaad, Ohio 



41 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




< lt-\ flund, OUlo 



42 



U , S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 







StiKtilt-hl Itiiildiiijur 
4 l< \r)iniil. Ohio 



43 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




« 



44 



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U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



1% 

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46 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



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l^ltfbr riaafl. .%•«. ri. ,... h.... 



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U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





Hutclftln>uii 1 hemioal A Alkali i'ompaay. Hatrhlasoa. Kaaaaa 

Illinois Steel Bri.l^'e Company. Kansas City. Missouri, contractors 
Iota Portiaad CeaieBt ( oatpaay of Texas. Dallas. Trxaa 

Bellefontaine Brldgf & Steel Company. Bellefontalne. Ohio, Contractors 

47 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 













'^ss^mmmMmwmsmmwm 




r«.| Dork.. T«« Ilurbo... v*„.„e.o,n 
liuluth A fro. a«««e R. H, Lomymnj 



48 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




I 




Alei«>rM, l.«»uiMiiiii» 

Owned by City of New Orleans 



49 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





€,r.«d ^,„„.,. Kn.,.u. Hun ,.„rk. .hl..«K«. Illi..oU 

MirhlKUB crank Mu.fl. h«kI«.^. MUhiK^u 

General Motors Property 



50 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




Fo...i.Ir.v. The- lUul^v Uu,...f.irt,.ri..c < o :...>. Yl i.lia« :.k;.. Iml ia..:. 

Itintiit Sturnt-r Bins. Marqiirtt,- < om.nt l|a....f arturi...-' « .... I.a<*nl1c. IMm.o.. 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





St. \ fn«*nt'i. < ollf>Kf Theatre 
^•hm A. Uine Mtinu«l TraiaiMK Kebool 

CkirsKo, lllfBoU 
Bolter's Sons. Chicago. lllinoiB. ConlraciorB 



52 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





Sheffirld PJ.v!,tt.r r«i.i|»a..y. TH..IMII |Poli^. Minutv^ntn 
jMikHOii Unn * oiniKiiiy. Ja* k^oii. M.rlimau 



53 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




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54 



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U . S . G Co's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



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66 



U . S . G Go's. 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 



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_ Eames & 1 oung. .St. Louis. Architects 

isconbin Bridge & Iron Company, Contractors 



66 



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U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




> 




John C. I/lken & Company 
Sebownlng. Michigan 



57 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 





\ H«*Mi<ltMi«i- imiieil It 



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Mm- ^;iuin:ii\ c liil» 



58 



U . S . G Go's 

MEXICAN GRAPHITE PAINT 




.1ST J; 




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'S^><?t.4teMS:Vfc. 



DISTRICT SALES 
() 1^^ V ICES 



NEW YORK 
PHILADELPHIA 
PITTSBURG 
CHICAGO . 
DENVER . 
SAN FRANCIS( « 

15T. LOULS 

MINNEAPOI 1 



.30 Church Street 

Land Title Building 

. Fulton Building 

liailway Exchange 

1 abor Building 

Phelan Building 

lUilway Exchange 

McKnight Building 



aOOOWVM MM«V«W« COM^AMV 



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